Dan Meyer — Introduction

The first week’s project in #edstartup is to introduce ourselves by way of a short video. Here’s mine.

The text:

My name is Dan Meyer. I’m a doctoral student at Stanford University in math education. It’s impossible to be at Stanford, in the belly of Silicon Valley, and not be curious about startup culture and startups generally. In math ed, a lot of them seem to be focused on cutting costs and finding inefficiencies rather than creating new sources of value. Those are interesting goals, certainly, but their end result so far seems to be putting video lectures online, which I think seems to fall short of the promise of technology so I’m real interested in ways of capturing that value and creating that value. So that’s my goal here, for this course. My initial efforts are at a website called 101questions, which aims to help math teachers find interesting, perplexing math problems. Looking forward to learning with you guys.

4 thoughts on “Dan Meyer — Introduction

  1. Dan,

    I can’t agree with you more about companies and entities spending an inordinate amount of time looking for ways to cut rather than grow. Even in school I quit asking for the resources to get what I want or need for my classroom and instead seek outside sources for help. During my first two years I got enough to equip my room with a Smart Board, the software, funds to go to the NCTM conference, and more than $25k for an award for an amazing student at school to help her continue her education after graduation. I also helped connect local businesses with the school for projects/resources and networked others in to serve on advisory committees. None of this cost the school a dime but it added to so much more than the bottom line.

  2. Yesterday a colleague asked me to ponder, “What excites you about education today?” Frankly, all we came up with was how certain technology in the classroom enables students to collaborate across the aisle and across the isle. Yours has promise. Even though technology is getting cheaper, it is still a major expense. If and when you plant your flag, perhaps you’ll consider the old Bell System idea of universal service– providing a baseline level of service to every school in the country–http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Universal_service without the monopoly, of course. BTW: thanks for your insights on my humanitarian word problem.

  3. Dan,

    This edstartup 101 course is really cool. Your teaching blog led me to it, and I’m definitely going to follow your progress. In fact, if enrollment is still open, it looks like a pretty valuable experience. Be seeing you!

    -Michael

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